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Basics of OS, Unix and Shell Programming

Basics of OS, Unix and Shell Programming

INR₹4,237.00 + GST

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SKU: cid_253690 Category: Tags: , ,

The aim of this course is to make you aware of the functioning of a multi-user operating system. This course serves as a foundation course for other higher level course in UNIX. The course will help you to learn commands while doing practical and it emphasizes more on those switches/options and flags which are most frequently used in real life.

 

Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, you will be able to:

  • Understand Operating System concepts
  • Use System calls and memory management
  • Use Unix commands and editors
  • Carry out Unix File management and shell programming in Unix
  • Do Network configuration and security management in Unix

Target Audience

The course can be taken by:

Students: All students who are pursuing any technical or professional degree courses in computer science IT.
Teachers/Faculties: All teachers/faculties who wish to acquire new skills or enhance their skills in UNIX and shell programming
Professionals: All working professionals, who wish to acquire new skills or who need to improve their efficiency in UNIX and shell programming.

 

Why learn basics of OS, Unix and Shell programming?

Unix and Shell Programming, are among the top skills that employers are seeking in their prospective employees every year. The top reason for the popularity of Unix Shell Scripting is its robust scope. It is a powerful programming method that can help you learn the command-line better, save time, and do away with tedious file management tasks. Shell scripting is at the heart of making OS work! With a rising requirement for speedy processing of huge amounts of data generated by applications, Unix is used more than ever to significantly reduce the turnaround time for the job. While the demand continues to grow for Unix shell scripting talent, there remains a shortage of experienced professionals in the market. There are unlimited career advancement opportunities for developers and systems administrators who are skilled in Unix Shell Scripting. Unix skills can also help IT professionals diversify into top-paying fields such as ETL Development/Testing, Big Data & Hadoop Development/Testing, Java Development/Testing, Unix SQL Production Support, and many other areas. However, choose some additional option with shell scripting, like Unix Systems Administration to get the best job opportunities.

 

Course Features

24X7 Access: You can view lectures as per your own convenience.
Online lectures: ~11 hours of online lectures with high-quality videos.
Updated Quality content: Content is latest and gets updated regularly to meet the current industry demands.

 

Test & Evaluation

There will be a final test containing a set of multiple choice questions. Your evaluation will include the scores achieved in the final test.

Note:
  1. The access to the course can be extended 3 months at a time (for upto 4 times) just by sending a mail requesting for an extension to the email id in the footer.
  2. The hard copy of the certificate shall be shipped to your registered address or your college
  3. There is no soft copy of the certificate.
  4. To get access to the certificate - you need to take the online exam at the end of the course

No prerequisites

 

Topics to be covered

Unit -1 Operating System Concepts
  • Overview of operating systems
  • Introduction to operating system concepts
  • System Calls
  • Types of Operating Systems
  • Process management
  • Scheduling
  • Scheduling Algorithms
  • Inter-process communication
  • Threads
  • Memory Management
  • Contiguous Memory Allocation
  • Swapping
  • File Concept
  • File Structure
  • Directories
  • Disk allocation and Access methods
  • I\O Hardware
  • I\O Software
  • Security
  • Graphical User Interface
  • Device driver
Unit -2 Linux Ideas and History
  • Open Source
  • Linux Origin
  • Red Hat Distributions
  • Linux Principles
Unit -3 Linux Usage Basics
  • Logging in to a Linux System
  • LINUX Virtual Consoles
  • Elements of the X Window System
  • X Window System
  • The X Client/Server Mode
  • Working with X
  • Running the X Window System
  • The X Server
  • Changing your password
  • The root user
  • Changing identities
  • Editing text files
Unit -4 Running Commands and Getting help
  • Running Commands
  • Some Simple commands
  • Getting Help
  • The whatis command
  • The help Option
  • The man command
  • Navigating man pages
  • The info command
  • Navigating info pages
  • Extended Documentation
  • Extended Documentation
Unit -5 Browsing the File System
  • Linux File Hierarchy Concepts
  • Some important directories
  • Current Working Directory
  • File and Directory Names
  • Absolute and Relative pathnames
  • Changing Directories
  • Listing Directory Contents
  • Copying Files and Directories
  • The Destination
  • Moving and Renaming Files and Directories
  • Moving and Renaming Directories
  • Creating Files
  • Removing Files
  • Creating Directories
  • Removing Directories
  • Using Nautilus
  • Determining File Content
Unit -6 The X-Window System
  • XOrg: The X11 Server
  • XOrg Server design
  • XOrg Server Configuration
  • XOrg Modularity
  • Server and Client Relationship
  • XOrg in runlevel 3
  • XOrg in runlevel 5
  • Quick Start
  • Remote X Sessions
Unit -7 Users, Groups and Permissions
  • Introduction to Users
  • Groups
  • Linux File Security
  • Permission Precedence
  • Permission Types
  • Examining Permission
  • Changing File Ownership
  • Changing Permissions – Symbolic Method
  • Changing Permissions – Symbolic Method
  • Changing Permissions – Numeric Method
Unit -8 Advanced Topics in Users, Groups and Permissions
  • User and Group ID Numbers
  • The /etc/passwd file
  • The /etc/shadow File
  • The /etc/group File
  • User Management tools
  • System Users and Groups
  • Monitoring logins
  • Default Permissions
  • Special Permissions for Executables
  • Permissions
  • Directory permissions
Unit -9 The Linux file system in-depth
  • Introduction to partitions in Linux
  • Introduction to Inodes
  • Directories in Linux
  • Inodes
  • Structure of Directory
  • cp and inodes
  • mv and inodes
  • rm and inodes
  • Hard Links
  • Symbolic (or soft) Links
  • The Seven Fundamental Filetypes
  • Checking Free Space using df command
  • Removable Media
  • Mounting CDs and DVDs
  • Mounting USB Media
  • The mount command
  • Archiving and Compressing Files
  • Creating, Listing and Extracting Tar File Archives
  • Creating File Archives: Other Tools
Unit -10 vim: An advanced text editor
  • Introducing Vim
  • Vim: A Modal Editor
  • Vim basics
  • Opening a file in Vim
  • Modifying a file in Vim
  • Saving a file and exiting Vim
  • Using Command Mode
  • Moving around
  • Search and Replace
  • Manipulating text
  • Undoing Changes
  • Visual mode
  • Using multiple windows in Vim
  • Learning more from Vim
Unit -11 Standard I/O and Pipes
  • Standard input and output
  • Redirecting Output to a File
  • Redirecting STDOUT to a Program(Piping)
  • Combining Output and Errors
  • Redirection to Multiple Targets (tee)
  • Redirecting STDIN from a file
  • Sending Multiple Lines to STDIN
Unit -12 Using the bash shell
  • Bash Introduction
  • Bash heritage and Features
  • Command line shortcuts
  • History tricks
  • Expansion
  • Quoting
  • Introduction to line editing
  • Readline interaction
  • Bindable readline commands
  • Using GNOME terminal
Unit -13 Configuring the Bash Shell
  • Bash Variables
  • Environment Variables
  • The TERM Environment Variable
  • The PATH Environment Variable
  • Some Common Variable
  • Aliases
  • How bash expands a Command Line
  • Preventing Expansion
  • Login vs. Non-Login Shell
  • Bash Startup Tasks: Profile
  • Bash Startup Tasks: bashrac
  • Bash Exit Tasks
Unit -14 Text Processing Tools
  • Tools for Extracting Text
  • Viewing File Contents
  • Extracting Text by Keyword
  • Tools for Analyzing Text
  • Spell Checking with aspell
  • Tools for manipulating Text
  • Sed
Unit -14 Text Processing Tools
  • Tools for Extracting Text
  • Viewing File Contents
  • Extracting Text by Keyword
  • Tools for Analyzing Text
  • Spell Checking with aspell
  • Tools for manipulating Text
  • Sed
Unit -15 Shell Programming
  • Scripting Basics
  • Creating Shell Scripting
  • Generating Output
  • Handling Input
  • Exit Status
  • Control Structure
  • Conditional Execution
  • The test COMMAND
  • Using Positional Parameters
  • Handling Parameters with Spaces
  • Scripting at the Command Lines
  • Shell Script Debugging
Unit -16 Investigating and Managing Process
  • What is a Process?
  • Listing Processes
  • Finding Processes
  • Signals
  • Sending Signals
  • Receiving signals
  • Scheduling Priority
  • Altering Scheduling Priority
  • Interactive Process Management Tools
  • Job Control
  • Scheduling Process
  • Corntab File Format
Unit -17 Finding and Processing Files
  • Locate
  • Locate examples
  • Find
  • Basic find examples
  • Find and logical operators
  • Find files based on permissions
  • Find and numeric criteria
  • Find and access times
  • Find Executing commands and examples
  • The GNOME search tool
Unit -18 Basic System Configuration Tools
  • TCP/IP network configuration
  • Managing Ethernet connections
  • Configuring wireless security
  • Configuring PPP (Point-to-Point) settings
  • Configuring IPv6 settings
  • Configuring Routes
  • Network configuration files
  • Linux printing
  • Setting the system's date and time
  • Starting a Service
  • Specifying Service Units
  • Listing Services
  • Displaying Service Status

Assignment 1:

  • Try the following command sequence and write its output: cd ; pwd ;ls -al; cd.; pwd (where did that get you?); cd .. ;pwd; ls -al; cd .. ; pwd; ls -al ;cd.. ;pwd (what happens now);cd /etc ;ls -al | more ;cat passwd ;cd – ;pwd.

Assignment 2:

  • Explore the filesystem tree using cd, ls, pwd and cat. Look in /bin, /usr/bin, /sbin, /tmp and /boot. What do you see?
  • Explore /dev. Can you identify what devices are available? Which are character-oriented and which  are block-oriented? Can you identify your tty (terminal) device (typing who am i might help); who is the owner of your tty (use ls -l)?
  • Explore /proc. Display the contents of the files interrupts, devices, cpuinfo, meminfo and uptime  using cat. Can you see why we say /proc is a pseudo-filesystem which allows access to kernel data structures?

Assignment 3:

  • Convert the decimal number 192 to octal and hexadecimal using bc command.
  • Run ps, the script command and run ps again. What is its output. Explain.
  • Write a command to create following directory structure in one command: ICT>COURSES->ONLINE55...
  • Create above  Directory Structure with permission 777.?
  • Run the following command and explain its output
    • cd ../..
    • mkdir ../bin
    • rmdir ..
    • ls ..
  • Write a command to remove entire directory structure ICT>COURSES->ONLINE55 in one command?
  • Run the command tty and note the device name of your terminal. Now run cp /etc/passwd to device name of your terminal. Explain its output.

Assignment 4:

  • How does the command mv bar1 bar2 behave, where both bar1 and bar2 are directories, when
    • bar2 exists
    • bar2 does not exist
  • Write a command to display lines common to a.txt and b.txt?
  • Write a command to display lines unique to a.txt?
  • Run script command and then issue dir,ls,pwd commands and then run exit. What is its output?
  • Write a command to compare two text files.
  • Write a command to copy a file with permission 444.Copy it again and explain your observation.
  • Use chmod –w. and then try to create and remove a file in the current directory. What is its output.
  • Run the commands
    • ls –ld. and
    • ls –l.. Explain its output.

Assignment 5:

  • Using vi editor write commands to do the following to combine five lines into a single line.
  • Search a pattern printf and then repeat the search in the opposite direction.
  • How will you insert /* at the beginning and */ at the end?
  • Using vi editor, write a command to copy line number 1,10 after line number 25.
  • Using vi editor, write a command to move line number 1,10 after line number 25.
  • Using vi editor, write a command to copy next 10 lines to a.txt.
  • Using vi editor, write a command to undo the last action.
  • Using vi editor, write a command to create abbreviation LU as Linux Unix.
  • Using vi editor, write a command to map ctrl+K to display manual of vi editor.

Assignment 6:

  • Write a command to convert the contents of a file a.txt to uppercase
  • Write a sequence of commands to convert 1st line of a file a.txt to uppercase
  • Write a command to display the name of a file in your current directory whose size is maximum.
  • Write a command to change the modification time of a file without modifying the file.
  • Write a command to display the name of a file in your current directory whose size is maximum.
  • We have a file emp.mast which consists of details of employees in an organization (Fields are  emp_id, emp_name, dept_name, basic_salary, designation, dob).Write a command to display name of employee who is not a director.
  • Write a command to display name and basic of each employee.

Assignment 7:

  • Using at command submit a job at 7 pm.
  • Using batch command submit a job at 7 pm..
  • Delete a job from queue.
  • Display the listing of jobs in queue.
  • Write a command to kill a job.

Assignment 8:

  • Write a command to display those lines in emp.mast in which ‘Training’ is present.
  • Write a command to display the names of employees in Training Department.
  • Write a command to display number of blank records in a file
  • Write a command to display the contents of a file emp.mast in sorted order on emp_id field
  • Write a command to display the contents of a file emp.mast in sorted order on basic_salary field
  • Write a command to display the name of the youngest employee
  • Write a command to create a backup of current directory

Assignment 9:

  • Write a Shell script to display factorial of a number. Number cannot be blank
  • Write a Shell script to send mail to all users on your System
  • Write a Shell script to find sum of prime numbers between 2 and 200
  • Write a Shell script to display sum of digits and number of digits in a number. Number cannot be blank. Write a Shell script /command to display the contents of a file in reverse order
  • Write a Shell script to display sum of prime factors of a number
  • We have a file emp.mast which consists of details of employees in an organization (Fields are  emp_id, emp_name, dept_name, basic_salary, designation, dob). Write a shell script to create a data entry screen for the file emp.mast
  • Write a shell script to modify records on the basis of emp_id .Emp_id should be entered by user or command line argument can be used.
  • Write a shell script to insert and delete a record from emp.mast file [Apply all validations]

Assignment 10:

    • Write a shell script to generate salary slip of employees (emp_id wise) in file emp.mast by using  following formula:
  • Net Salary = Basic + DA + HRA + CCA - EPF
  • Write a shell script to check spelling in a file and replace misspelled word.
  • Write a script that compares two directories bar1 and bar2 and copies all files in bar1 to bar2, which are not present in bar2
  • Write a script that checks each minute and reports on who logs in and who logs out
  • Write a script which converts 1st character of each line in a file to uppercase
  • Write a shell function size() which lists only the total size of the files supplied as arguments
  • Use the above function to display size of all files in a directory. Directory Name should be supplied at command line
  • Write a shell script to add, modify and delete users without using system administration command